Duke Energy implements protocols to protect bats from wind power turbines

US-based Duke Energy Renewables is working on a project that can prevent killing or injuring bats when they accidentally come into contact with wind turbines.

The reasons why bats are attracted to the wind turbines are still unknown. Scientists believe that due to having poor vision, the bats are likely to mistake the turbines as large trees.

The project was initiated by American Wind Energy Association, which had formed a committee for the purpose.

Led by Duke Energy Renewables environmental director and biologist Tim Hayes, the project team has suggested slowing down the wind turbine rotor speeds during low-wind conditions around August and September, since this is the time of year when bats migrate and breed.

US-based Duke Energy Renewables is working on a project that can prevent killing or injuring bats when they accidentally come into contact with wind turbines.

The reasons why bats are attracted to the wind turbines are still unknown. Scientists believe that due to having poor vision, the bats are likely to mistake the turbines as large trees.

The project was initiated by American Wind Energy Association, which had formed a committee for the purpose.

Led by Duke Energy Renewables environmental director and biologist Tim Hayes, the project team has suggested slowing down the wind turbine rotor speeds during low-wind conditions around August and September, since this is the time of year when bats migrate and breed.